Seafood Sightings: April 10, 2014

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Try experimenting with one of these seafood recipes — oil-poached fish, tunatrout-a coconut ceviche, Caribbean jerk-seasoned flounder or shrimp nachos. For more familiar recipes, check out the shrimp chowder and fried snapper.

Shrimp Curry

another fresh seafood idea

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When shopping for shrimp, look for those that are firm and not slippery. Beware shrimp_curry of shrimp that are bright pink or red. They have a “cooked” appearance due to not being properly iced.

  • 1 1/2 pounds cooked small shrimp, peeled
  • 4 tablespoons margarine or butter
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped onion
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons pressed garlic
  • 7 tablespoons flour
  • 3 tablespoons curry powder (or more to taste)
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 14 1/2-ounce can chicken broth
  • 1 cup light cream
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • cooked rice

Prepare rice according to package directions.

In large saucepan, melt margarine over medium heat. Sauté onion and garlic until tender. Stir in flour, curry powder, ginger and salt. Add chicken broth and blend. Stir in cream and cook until thickened, stirring constantly. Add shrimp and lemon juice. Continue cooking until shrimp are heated. Do not allow to boil. Serve over hot rice. Service 6.

From: Mariner’s Menu: 30 Years of Fresh Seafood Ideas

Contributed by Joyce Taylor

Seafood Sightings: April 3, 2014

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Spring provides more than warm weather. It brings to the docks all types of trout-aseafood, from grouper to crabs. To find out more on species that currently are being harvested, check out the seafood availability card for spring.

  • My Outer Banks Home features pan-seared shrimp on page 35 of the Spring 2014 issue. On pages 37-38, read about Sea Grant’s Marine Education Specialist, Terri Kirby-Hathaway: http://www.myouterbankshome-digi.com/i/279175

Seafood Nutrition Leaders: Judy Blessing

seafood traditions

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Judy Blessing Photo by Scott Taylor

Judy Blessing
Photo by Scott Taylor

Cod and canned tuna were about the only fish dishes on Judy Blessing’s menus before moving South. “Being from a Catholic family, I can remember eating fish every Friday,” recalls the Athol, Mass., native. “We only had cod with tartar sauce or tuna casserole. Nothing fancy.” Plus, she wasn’t allowed in the kitchen, either, except to do the dishes.

All that changed when she married her husband, Frank, in 1977, and moved on board a 32-foot sailboat dubbed “Moon Mist.” For six years, the newlyweds toured the world, sailing to the Caribbean, Ireland, England, the Mediterranean and finally the South. In 1983, they docked their boat in Beaufort, becoming the first to tie up at the new downtown dock. They started a farm and settled into the county where they knew they could farm and fish.

Find out more about Judy Blessing and her fellow Nutrition Leaders in Mariner’s Menu: 30 Years of  Fresh Seafood Ideas. It is available from North Carolina Sea Grant by calling 919/515-9101 or 252/222-6307, from your local bookstore, or from UNC Press.

From: Mariner’s Menu: 30 Years of Fresh Seafood Ideas

Contributed by Joyce Taylor

Seafood Sightings: March 27, 2014

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Get inspired by some great seafood recipes that will make your family happy!

Seafood Sightings: March 20, 2014

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From savory pies to a simple salad, these seafood dishes are sure to satisfy.

Baked Scallops

another fresh seafood idea

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In Greek mythology, the love goddess Aphrodite rose from the sea and was borne across the water on a scallop shell. The Roman goddess Venus was born from abaked_scallops scallop shell. Since that time, artists and poets have paid tribute to the scallop.

The apostle St. James wore the scallop shell as his emblem. And pilgrims who visited what was believed to be his tomb received a scallop shell. The graceful shell is still known to the French as “coquille St. Jacques,” or “St. James shell.”

Three species of scallops are commercially important to the Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic. The bay scallop shell grows up to four inches wide and is found in bays and estuaries from New England through North Carolina. The edible meat is the adductor muscle, which is about one-half to three-fourths of an inch in size.

Growing twice as large, the sea scallop comes from the deep waters of the North and Mid-Atlantic. Its meat is one to two inches wide. The plentiful calico scallop, much smaller than the bay, is caught primarily off the Florida coast.

  • 1 pound bay scallops (or sea scallops, quartered)
  • 2 tablespoons dry white wine
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground white pepper
  • 1/4 cup heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup fresh bread crumbs mixed with 2 tablespoons melted margarine or butter

Mix wine, lemon juice, salt and pepper in medium bowl. Stir in scallops. Add cream and stir.

Place in a shallow, medium, greased baking dish. Sprinkle with crumb mixture. Bake at 400 F until scallops are done, mixture is bubbly and crumbs are browned, about 15 to 20 minutes. Serves 4.

From: Mariner’s Menu: 30 Years of Fresh Seafood Ideas

Contributed by Joyce Taylor