Category Archives: Another Fresh Seafood Idea

Catfish Gumbo Supreme

another fresh seafood idea

Catfish Gumbo Supreme. Photo by Vanda Lewis

Catfish Gumbo Supreme. Photo by Vanda Lewis

Once passed over because of their muddy, oily taste, today’s mild-flavored catfish have a new image. The farm-raised fish are fed a grain diet. This ensures a mild, “nonfishy” flavor. They are so mild, in fact, that they need more seasonings than most other fish. A versatile fish, catfish can be prepared in a variety of ways. Try grilling, broiling, steaming, stir-frying or other favorite cooking methods. And of course, there are always the traditional fried recipes we occasionally enjoy.

  • 4 medium catfish fillets
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 cup coarsely chopped celery
  • 1/2 cup chopped green onion, including tops
  • 3/4 cup chopped onion
  • 4 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 2 14 1/2-ounce cans chicken broth
  • 2 14 1/2-ounce cans chopped tomatoes, undrained
  • 1/2 teaspoon thyme
  • 1 small bay leaf
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon oregano
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 boxes frozen sliced okra
  • 4 ounces orzo (optional)

Cut fillets into 1-inch pieces and set aside.

Heat oil in large pot over medium heat. Lightly sauté celery, green onion, onion and garlic. Add broth, tomatoes, thyme, bay leaf, cayenne, oregano and salt. Bring to boil and add okra. Cover and simmer 15 minutes. Add orzo. Cover and continue simmering 15 minutes. Add catfish and simmer 10 minutes or until fish flakes easily. Remove bay leaf. Serves 8 to 10.

From: Mariner’s Menu: 30 Years of Fresh Seafood Ideas

Contributed by Joyce Taylor

Crispy Fried Catfish

another fresh seafood idea

Crispy Fried Catfish. Photo by Vanda Lewis

Crispy Fried Catfish. Photo by Vanda Lewis

The catfish, long relegated to the lowly position of an unglamourous scavenger, has now become a national favorite. Graduating from the river bottom to the farm, pond-raised catfish are making their appearance in white-cloth restaurants as well as in supermarkets.

  • 6 small catfish, pan dressed
  • 1 2-ounce bottle of Tabasco sauce
  • salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup yellow cornmeal
  • vegetable oil for frying

Marinate fish in Tabasco sauce for 30 minutes in refrigerator, turning once. Remove from sauce and lightly salt, then pepper. Roll in cornmeal to cover completely.

Heat oil in deep fat fryer or skillet to 375 F. Place fish in hot oil, and cook until golden brown on both sides. Drain on paper towels. Serve with tartar sauce. Serves 6.

Note: It sounds as if the Tabasco will make the fish too hot, but it won’t. It will add flavor only.

From: Mariner’s Menu: 30 Years of Fresh Seafood Ideas 

Contributed by Joyce Taylor

French-Fried Shrimp

another fresh seafood idea

French-Fried Shrimp. Photo by Vanda Lewis

French-Fried Shrimp. Photo by Vanda Lewis

Seafood is done when it is golden brown. Remove from the oil immediately and drain the fish or shellfish on paper towels. Be careful not to overcook or the food will dry out. A minute can make a difference. It’s like that steak on the grill  give it just a few more seconds and it’s overdone.

  • 1 pound medium shrimp
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon paprika
  • 1/4 teaspoon Tabasco sauce
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 1/2 cup dry bread crumbs
  • oil for frying

Peel shrimp, leaving last section of shell on tail. Combine egg, salt, pepper, paprika and Tabasco in medium bowl.

Combine flour and crumbs in medium shallow dish. Dip each shrimp in egg mixture, then in flour mixture. Fry in deep fat, 350 F, until golden brown, about 6 to 8 minutes. Drain on paper towels. Serves 3 to 4.

Go behind the scenes of this photo shoot.
From: Mariner’s Menu: 30 Years of Fresh Seafood Ideas 

Contributed by Joyce Taylor

Broiled Oysters with Fine Herbs

another fresh seafood idea

Broiled_Oysters_Fine_Herbs_216

Broiled Oysters with Fine Herbs. Photo by Vanda Lewis

You’ll notice that our recipes tell you to use rock salt in the pan when cooking oysters in their shells. A deep layer allows you to level the oysters in the salt, making them steady and also keeping the contents from spilling out of the uneven shells.

Remember to use caution when eating raw or partially cooked oysters.

  • 3 dozen select oysters
  • 1/4 pound margarine or butter, softened
  • 3/4 cup green onion, including tops, finely chopped
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped fresh parsley
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped fresh tarragon
  • 1/4 cup fresh cracker crumbs
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
  • rock salt

Shuck oysters and place the deep half of the shells level on a bed of rock salt on baking pan. Mix together margarine, onion, parsley, tarragon, crumbs and lemon juice. Divide evenly over oysters. Broil about 4 inches from heat until done, about 5 to 8 minutes. Serves 6.

From: Mariner’s Menu: 30 Years of Fresh Seafood Ideas 

Contributed by Joyce Taylor

Fish Flake and Macaroni Salad

another fresh seafood idea

Fish_Flake_Mac-2

Fish Flake and Macaroni Salad. Photo by Vanda Lewis

One of the Nutrition Leaders’ first tasks back in the early 1970s was to create healthy, tasty and low-cost dishes with fresh fish flakes. Back then, that meant using mostly canned tuna and salmon.

Today homemade flaked fish using fresh fillets or shellfish provides a versatile alternative to the popular canned fish we buy. Delicious appetizers, salads, sandwiches, fish cakes and casseroles can be easily prepared with fresh fish flakes. And they can be used in any recipe that calls for canned fish.

  • 1 1/2 cups fish flakes
  • 4 ounces small shell macaroni
  • 1/2 cup chopped celery
  • 1/3 cup chopped onion
  • 2 tablespoons chopped green pepper
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise (or to desired consistency)
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon celery seed
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 small jar chopped pimento, drained
  • 1 8-ounce can sweet peas, drained
  • paprika
  • lettuce leaves
  • Garnish: tomato wedges

Cook macaroni according to package directions. Drain. Rinse with cold water. Drain while cutting up celery, onion and pepper.

Place mayonnaise in medium bowl. Add salt, celery seed, black pepper and mix well. Add celery, onion, green pepper and pimento and mix. Add macaroni and mix well.

Gently blend in fish flakes and peas. Chill well before serving. Arrange on lettuce leaves. Sprinkle with paprika. Garnish with tomato wedges. Serves 8 to 10. (Excellent when made one day and served the next.)

From: Mariner’s Menu: 30 Years of Fresh Seafood Ideas 

Contributed by Joyce Taylor

Deep Fried Flounder

another fresh seafood idea

Deep Fried Flounder Photo by Vanda Lewis

Deep Fried Flounder. Photo by Vanda Lewis

No cooking method except deep-frying results in such a contrast of a crispy outside and tender inside. Just see how much seafood is fried, not only at home, but also in restaurants. Many an eatery has built a lasting reputation on the basis of “Calabash” cooking — the fried seafood named after the Carolina location.

To deep fry, choose a deep-fryer, Dutch oven, wok or deep, heavy pan. Add only enough oil to fill one-third of the container. This provides room for the bubbling that occurs when the fish is dropped in and for the space taken up by the food. The seafood should be immersed in the oil. Vegetable oil makes the best medium for deep-frying.

  • 1 pound flounder fillets, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 tablespoon milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup cornmeal
  • oil for frying

In small bowl, combine egg, milk, salt and pepper. Place cornmeal in shallow dish. Dip fish in egg mixture, then roll in cornmeal. Fry in deep fat at 375 F until golden brown, about 8 to 10 minutes. Drain on paper towels. Serves 3 to 4. (Smaller, thinner pieces near the tail will require about 2 minutes less cooking time.)

From: Mariner’s Menu: 30 Years of Fresh Seafood Ideas 

Contributed by Joyce Taylor

 

Flounder with Fresh Mushrooms in Parchment

another fresh seafood idea

(printer-friendly version)

Flounder in parchment.Parchment can be cut into rectangular or oval shapes. But the classic pattern is a heart shape.

Cut a piece of parchment 12 x 18 inches or slightly more than twice as wide as the fillet to be cooked. (The extra room allows for sealing.) Fold in half (12 x 9 inches). Starting at the fold, draw half a heart shape and cut it. Unfold.

Lightly oil all but a 2-inch border of the parchment. Center food on one side of the heart, near the fold. Leave a 2-inch border at the edge.

Fold the parchment over the food so the cut edges meet. Starting at one end, fold a small section of parchment together, then fold again. Hold this section down and fold the next section. Continue until edges are completely sealed.

Place on a baking sheet and place in a preheated oven. Cook for the designated time.

The pouch will puff up with steam and brown during cooking.

  • 1 1/2 pounds flounder fillets
  • vegetable oil
  • 6 tablespoons margarine or butter
  • 2 cups sliced fresh mushrooms
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped green onion, including tops
  • 1/4 cup dry vermouth
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh parsley
  • salt
  • freshly ground white pepper

Cut fillets into serving sizes. Prepare 4 to 6 pieces of parchment. Lightly oil each piece.

In medium skillet, melt margarine over medium heat. Lightly sauté mushrooms and green onion. Add vermouth and simmer until liquid is almost gone. Add parsley.

Place fish on parchment and sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper. Place equal amount of mushroom mixture over each. Close parchment. Place on baking sheet. Bake at 400 F until puffed and lightly browned, about 12 to 15 minutes. Place on serving plates. Serves 4 to 6.

From: Mariner’s Menu: 30 Years of Fresh Seafood Ideas

Contributed by Joyce Taylor