Clam Dip

another fresh seafood idea

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We’ve found that some of the simplest appetizers taste best. Simplicity also shortens preparation time. And many of the recipes, such as cold spreads and clam_dipdips, can be prepared ahead of time. In fact, they often taste better when made a day before serving.

  • 1 cup cooked clams, minced, liquid reserved
  • 6 ounces cream cheese, softened
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons grated onion
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/8 teaspoon Tabasco sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon minced fresh parsley

Blend together cream cheese, lemon juice, onion, Worcestershire, Tabasco, salt and parsley. Add clams and mix well. Add reserved liquid until desired consistency is reached. Chill thoroughly. Serve with assorted crackers and chips. Makes about 2 cups.

From: Mariner’s Menu: 30 Years of Fresh Seafood Ideas

Contributed by Joyce Taylor

Seafood Sightings: September 19, 2014

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In its Harvest issue, Edible Piedmont discusses consuming local and lesser-known fish. In the article, Barry Nash, Sea Grant’s Seafood Technology & Marketing Specialist, talks about his work with catch groups and the seafood availability chart.

  • Edible Piedmont features an article on consuming local and lesser known-fish on pages 26-29. They share recipes for triggerfish with fall hash on page 30 and country oyster dressing with brussels sprouts on page 18: onlinedigeditions.com/publication/?m=10998&l=1

Seafood Sightings: September 12, 2014

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If you need a few new ways to prepare Spanish mackerel, take a minute to review these fantastic and creative recipes.

  • Carolina Fish Market has six tasty recipes for Spanish mackerel: Holden Beach Grilled Spanish Mackerel; Kiawah Beer Battered Spanish Mackerel; Topsail Island Grilled Spanish Mackerel; Cheesy Oven-Fried Wilmington Spanish Mackerel; Oak Island Lemon and Pepper Spanish Mackerel; Jimmy’s Lime Pepper Spanish Mackerel: carolinafishmarket.com/tasty-spanish-mackerel-recipes/

Nutrition Leaders: Lissie McNamee

seafood traditions

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Living on the coast has its advantages.

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Lissie McNamee
Photo by Scott Taylor

“I have my own gill net – 50 feet long – three crab pots and a rowboat,” says Lissie McNamee of Merrimon. “It’s just enough for me to go out there and catch a few mullet when I can on Cedar Creek off the Intercoastal Waterway. I do it right from my yard.”

She can dip her crab pots off the pier jutting from her house, too, for a few fresh blue crabs for dinner. “If you’ve got it right there in your front yard, you might as well learn how to harvest it,” she says.

McNamee has learned more than how to catch a crab in her 20-year tenure with the Nutrition Leaders. Before joining the group, McNamee had never cleaned a crab or filleted a fish. “I really only knew frying,” she recalls.

She grew up on a farm near Wilson’s Mills, the sixth of seven children, and learned basic cooking skills helping out in the kitchen.

“We had lots of vegetables. We grew our own,” she says. “And we raised our own beef and pork. Plus we had sheep, chickens and goats.”

Then in 1963 she had the good fortune to marry a man who caught, cleaned and cooked his own catch. For 16 years, her husband, Wayne, a commercial fisherman, brought home fresh snapper, shark, grouper and the likes straight from the sea.

Joining the Nutrition Leaders in the late 1980s taught McNamee even more ways to prepare their fresh-caught fare. Plus she learned how seafood helps fight fat.

Find out more about Lissie McNamee and her fellow Nutrition Leaders in Mariner’s Menu: 30 Years of Fresh Seafood Ideas. It is available from North Carolina Sea Grant by calling 919/515-9101 or 252/222-6307, from your local bookstore, or from UNC Press.

Seafood Sightings: September 4, 2014

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This week’s round-up includes several excellent seafood recipes that you should try including shrimp and green bean almondine, spaghetti with soy sauce butter scallops, shrimp and grits with stewed tomatoes, chile lime shrimp pineapple kabobs and crab fried rice. Enjoy!

Seafood Sightings: August 29, 2014

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Make plans to celebrate Labor Day weekend with fresh seafood. Choose from sweet and spicy shrimp skewers, fish tacos, shrimp tortilla pizza, baked blue cheese and lime shrimp or a spicy crab and lentil soup. Stay safe!

Boiled Hard Crabs

another fresh seafood idea

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If you are going to boiled_crabsserve boiled or steamed hard crabs, a coastal favorite, you can dress them before or after cooking. It’s a matter of personal preference.

To learn how to dress hard crabs, visit: marinersmenu.org/2012/06/12/transporting-and-dressing-live-crabs.

  • 3 dozen live blue crabs
  • 6 quarts water
  • Old Bay Seafood Seasoning (or other)
  • salt

Season and salt water according to seasoning package directions. Bring to rolling boil. Place crabs in water. Cover and boil until crabs reach an internal temperature of 158 F and remain there for at least 1 minute, about 15 minutes. Serves 3 to 4.

From: Mariner’s Menu: 30 Years of Fresh Seafood Ideas

Contributed by Joyce Taylor