Nutrition Leaders: Kay Holm

seafood traditions

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Kay Holm Photo by Scott Taylor

Kay Holm
Photo by Scott Taylor

Squid. That was the first seafood ingredient Kay Holm was introduced to as the newest Nutrition Leader one day at the Seafood Lab in the early 1980s. “I looked at it and thought, ooooooh. But it was darned good!” says the long-time Merrimon resident. “We cleaned them. We fried them. Those things were buggers. But they were very, very good.” The group even served the recipe at Carteret County’s Strange Seafood Festival the following year, and she remembers people coming back for seconds.

In almost 20 years with Taylor and the Nutrition Leaders, Holm has learned a lot more, too, about other species, ways to cook seafood, herb and spice use, and entertaining with seafood.

“I learned a great deal about cooking fish,” she says. “I can look at a fish that comes out of the sea and say, ‘I think I know what I can do with it.’ ”

Find out more about Kay Holm and her fellow Nutrition Leaders in Mariner’s Menu: 30 Years of  Fresh Seafood Ideas. It is available from North Carolina Sea Grant by calling 919/515-9101 or 252/222-6307, from your local bookstore, or from UNC Press.

From: Mariner’s Menu: 30 Years of Fresh Seafood Ideas

Contributed by Joyce Taylor

Seafood Sightings: June 12, 2014

seafood sightings

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Hot, humid weather has settled in along the coast, which has triggered intense cravings for fresh seafood.

Be sure to try the soft-shell crab recipes from Island Free Press before the season ends. Enjoy!

Seafood Sightings: June 5, 2014

seafood sightings

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trout-aThis week, recommended seafood recipes include shrimp salad, crab cakes, steamed clams, sautéed shrimp and shrimp with a peanut sauce. Enjoy!

  • Midtown Magazine features a unique appetizer for shrimp salad wrapped in cucumber in the May/June issue on page 56: midtownmag.com/articles.asp

Crab Soup Deluxe

another fresh seafood idea

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crab-soup-deluxeSeafood soups — such as stews, chowders and bisques — offer a variety of delicious meals. They can look elegant, too, as many recipes call for ingredients such as clams in the shell, soft or hard crabs, or shrimp in the shell.

  • 1 pound lump crabmeat
  • 3 tablespoons margarine or butter
  • 2 1/2 cups chopped onion
  • 1/2 teaspoon pressed garlic
  • 3 14 1/2 ounce cans chopped tomatoes, undrained
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/8 teaspoon Tabasco sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon marjoram
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon fresh lemon juice
  • zest of 1 lemon
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh parsley

Remove any shell or cartilage from crabmeat.

Melt margarine in large saucepan over medium heat. Sauté onion and garlic until tender but not brown. Add tomatoes, salt, pepper, Tabasco, marjoram, thyme, lemon juice, and lemon zest. Bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer 30 minutes until flavors are mingled and tomato liquid is reduced. Add parsley and crabmeat. Heat thoroughly, but do not overcook crabmeat. Serve immediately. Serves 8 to 10.

From: Mariner’s Menu: 30 Years of Fresh Seafood Ideas

Contributed by Joyce Taylor

 

Seafood Sightings: May 29, 2014

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There are numerous ways to prepare seafood. Check out these tasty recipes ideas!

Seafood Sightings: May 22, 2014

seafood sightings

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The “If you Can’t Beat ‘em, Eat ‘em” lionfish/lobster spearfishing tournament is setLionFish for May 30 to June 8, in Beaufort, N.C. This annual tournament is held to raise awareness of the lionfish invasive species problem.

Below are instructions for dressing lionfish and several easy recipes. Enjoy!

Nutrition Leaders: Martha Giles

seafood traditions

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Martha Giles Photo by Scott Taylor

Martha Giles
Photo by Scott Taylor

“I don’t really remember ‘learning’ to cook,” Martha Giles says. “We just did it, I guess from helping Mother,” back in her Chadbourne kitchen in Columbus County. “I do remember as a teenager baking on Saturday afternoons  homemade yeast rolls for hamburger buns for small family gatherings, lemon pies and cream puffs.”

Growing up close to the ocean, “We cooked a goodly amount of seafood, especially fish and oysters,” Giles recalls. “Our fish was usually fried or baked. But oysters  they were the best. I remember my mother bringing home quarts of shucked oysters that she bought from fishermen for about a dollar a quart. They were fried, stewed or my favorite, scalloped. Many were eaten raw.”

Marrying a fisherman  and a good cook himself  kept Giles close to the bounty of the sea. Often her husband, Thad, slipped down from Raleigh to Core Banks to fish for flounder, pompanos, bluefish and spots. Then they bought a little house near the water so he could stay a couple days at a time. In 1982 the Giles retired to Davis for good. Now they could fish whenever they wanted. Surf fishing mostly, for flounder, blues and spots. She remembers one trip, especially, when the fish were coming in so fast she recalls telling them to wait!

The Giles ate or froze their catch most of the time, or shared it with friends back in Raleigh. They baked or fried fish at first. Thad could make a mean tempura. And “I still can’t cook clam chowder (Manhattan-style) like he does. He likes to use the calico clams for this.”

Joining the Nutrition Leaders from the Gloucester Extension Club around 1985 opened Giles’ eyes to the possibilities and potential of seafood.

Find out more about Martha Giles and her fellow Nutrition Leaders in Mariner’s Menu: 30 Years of  Fresh Seafood Ideas. It is available from North Carolina Sea Grant by calling 919/515-9101 or 252/222-6307, from your local bookstore, or from UNC Press.

From: Mariner’s Menu: 30 Years of Fresh Seafood Ideas

Contributed by Joyce Taylor